The 5 Best Commentaries for the Fundamentalist!


Commentaries are important. But there’s two errors associated with them!

  • Depending on them too much and
  • not using them at all.

There are problems associated with all the Commentaries. It doesnt matter if a Baptist wrote it. it does’nt matter if john the Baptist wrote it! If a man wrote it, there’s errors. You just have to know what their problems are, and you can duck them. Here’s the list!

  1. The Bible Knowledge Commentary. By far the best, but with MAJOR problems! It is Evangelical to the core, the authors believe in a Universal Church, and are opposed to separation from error, despite repeated Biblical injunctions to do so. The biggest flaw to it is Walvoord’s decision to base it upon the NIV. Besides these major problems, the BKC remains the best commentary.
  2. Matthew Henry. Calvinist, Amillienialist, post-tribulation rapture, and a tendency to view many prophetic passages as allegorical. Not surprising, as the angel was told to seal up the vision until the time of the end. In Henry’s time, VERY few men understood dispensationalism, as the Bible epxlains in Daniel that was sealed until the time of the end… and we’re in those days. Unable to understand 20% of the Bible, Henry still does a very good job at interpreting the Bible. He has many points to make ini it that are quite good.
  3. John Gill. Many of the same problems. I went through a John Gill phase in Seminary, it lasted about 9 months. Gill’s big thing was to go through the Talmud and other Jewish writings to research what they had to say about Scripture. Interesting, but not your first choice of commentary.
  4. Summarized┬áBible. What it says! weakness – doesn’t really give MUCH insight into scripture. not to be used as your only Commentary, but in conjunction with others.
  5. Numerical Bible. More interesting than what the title says!
  6. Pulpit commentary. This one is for pastors. Valuable insights on how to preach something.

If you have to pick one, get the BKC. It’s pricy. $49.95 is what I paid for it. I’ve bought it twice, once for Wordsearch, once for logos, and it came with my Quickverse Platinum package. Buying the BKC unfortunately means your logos Basic package (free) now goes up to $60, because you need another $10 for the King James.

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